Elisabeth Elliot

Self-Discipline: A Matter of Grit and Grace

Welcome to the first of four LEgacy Link-ups for the summer of 2019! We are so excited! With Mother’s Day coming up, We would like this link-up to be All About Women who have or are Leaving a Legacy for us to follow. I started us out writing about Susie Spurgeon and Susanna Wesley. Now read what guest writer, Michele Morin from Living Our Days wants to share with us. Then write and share your own legacy story at the bottom.

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Self-Discipline: A Matter of Grit and Grace

With an empty house, a clean kitchen, laundry on the line (and even a sleeping dog!), it was a perfect afternoon to study or write. Deadlines were looming; however . . . the sun was shining, bath towels flapped and danced on the clothesline outside, and suddenly, while there was plenty that needed doing, the will to do it was lacking.

“Maybe I’ll call a friend,” I mused. “Or this would be a great day to wash windows!”

An Example to Live by

When I’m pondering the possibility of veering off course in some small way, I remember the faithful example of Elisabeth Elliot, who readily admitted that she was also subject to all the usual distractions and reluctance when it was time to sit down and write. She spoke of “taking herself by the scruff of the neck” and sitting herself down before the task at hand.

SHaping of a Christian Family
TSOACH, Updated in 2005

Raised by attentive parents who set high standards for her behavior, Elisabeth inherited a “habit of order” (TSOACH, 73) and a love for uncluttered efficiency that I have had to live my way into as an adult. Then, in the Ecuadorian jungles, Elisabeth witnessed the patient diligence of tribal people whose very lives depended upon their hard work through mud, thorns, snakes, steep climbing, and deep forests. Measuring her own small inconveniences against the lot of women who regularly carried hundred-pound packs on their backs, she was startled into an awareness of her tendency to complain about small inconveniences.

A Cracked Pot

Elisabeth had no illusions about her own status as a sinner, “a cracked pot” whose supreme privilege it was to reveal in her own life “the light of the knowledge of the glory of God.” (2 Corinthians 4:6) By grace, however, she was able to speak truth with grit, even on topics that are usually off limits. For example, with wry humor, she noted that no one is actually qualified to address self-discipline around eating habits because if you don’t struggle with your weight, you don’t know how hard it is, and if you do struggle, you’ve got no room to talk!

"..if you don’t struggle with your weight, you don’t know how hard it is, and if you do struggle, you’ve got no room to talk!" #Elisabeth Elliot #LegacyLinkUp Click To Tweet

Naturally slender, Elisabeth found to her surprise that as she aged, she could pick up a few extra pounds when she traveled. To avoid gaining weight unawares, she weighed herself daily, reasoning that (1) it’s better to keep weight off than to shed pounds once they have been gained; (2) it’s easier to lose five pounds immediately than fifteen pounds later.

Who Left a Legacy for Elisabeth?

A Lamp For My Feet

Mentored by the writing of Amy Carmichael, Elisabeth endeavored to apply the counsel that shaped Amy’s perspective in doing things that were not to her liking:  “See in it a chance to die.” (ALFMF, 30) The small offerings, tiny deaths to self that we make every day are a way of cooperating with God, and this is a theme that ran through Elisabeth’s writing and speaking ministries—because it also runs through Scripture. She described it as the “interworking of the will of God and the will of man.” (ALFMF, 21) Responding in self-discipline is an opportunity to participate in God’s work here on earth as surely as those who filled the water pots in Cana or distributed the loaves and fish on a grassy Galilean hillside.

So, I’ll do the next thing today, trusting God to put words on the page and grateful for the example of a mentor from afar. Elisabeth Elliot blended grit and grace so consistently that it is impossible to tell—and pointless to wonder—where one ends and the other begins.

-Michele Morin

Works Cited

{affiliate links}

A Lamp for My Feet, 1985 (ALFMF)

The Shaping of a Christian Home, 1992 (TSOACH)
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Table Mentoring book

Table Mentoring: Blessed to Be a Blessing

I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I am not being paid to write this or being told what to say.

 

 Table Mentoring: A Simple Guide for Coming Alongside by Sue Moore Donaldson.

table mentoring book covver

I’ve had a desire to come alongside others for years now. (And have actually been doing it) But I really didn’t feel like I knew what I was doing. This little book gave me assurance that I was doing the right thing plus a few more pointers as well.

I’ve heard the admonishment that each of us should not only have a mentor but be a mentor as well. Are you turning back to give someone behind you a hand? This little guide will help you do it.

Here’s an excerpt Sue asked me to share with you …

In my early 20’s I met Jeanne Garrison. Jeanne was wise, gracious, funny, and for some reason, loved me. She showed it by pouring her wisdom into me, her time into my time, her life into my life. Living life with Jeanne alongside made all the difference.

I was a new college grad, starting my first whirl into the real work world—single and facing my first career, a new roommate, a new town, and a new church family. Not floundering exactly, but needing emotional, practical and spiritual support.

Meeting my Mentor

I don’t remember how we first met one-on-one. I do remember sitting at Jeanne’s table, talking and talking, usually a cup of tea in one hand and a pen in the other. (It was good to have a pen when I spent time with Jeanne.) I also remember Jeanne’s response: spoken with a smile, a gentle word, often a chuckle of understanding–never a judgment:

“You know, Sue, this is how it was with my mother.”

“Sounds like you could use help in this area – let me get this organized for you.”

“The most important thing you can tell your students is that God is your most important thing.”

You see why I was grateful. Everyone needs a Jeanne.

In my late 20’s I met Karen and Carol, Debbie and Gerri. They were high school Juniors—smart, motivated, filled with dreams and goals, and for some reason, they loved me, too. I asked them one afternoon:

“Would you like to meet with me after school some day–say, Wednesday? We can talk about your dreams and goals, your guy-relationships, your mom-relationships, and most of all, your relationship with God?”

They said, “Yes” and off we went. We met three months, once a week, and then, I sent each on their way: to meet with a Freshman girl. Fresh from our three months, on to a new three months. Table mentoring, one-to-one, one-to-three. Passing on what they knew, what I knew and now, I pass it on to you.

Table mentoring worked.

For me, for Jeanne, for high school girls ready to fly. And it can for you, as well.

Do you need a table to Table Mentor? No. But a table imbues intimacy—an elbow-touching-grab-a-hand-in-prayer type of closeness. Maybe not at the first meet-up, but definitely in the mix along the way.

Table, bench, back steps, dorm hallway, coffee house

—choose whichever promotes the progress of a hearty sharing. The place or porch doesn’t matter. Taking the time to listen does. Tell a story, gently nudge, cry some, laugh a lot, and give all to the Mighty Counselor before and after and maybe in the middle. Coming together until the misery is out of the commiserate as you both sit at Jesus’ feet.

come alongside

I love to describe MENTORING as “to come alongside”

which is found in The Message version of I Corinthians 1: 3 and 4–

“God comes alongside us when we go through hard times,

and before you know it, He brings us alongside someone else

who is going through hard times so that we can be there for

that person just as God was there for us.” 

I Corinthians 1:3,4 MSG

 

Two things to consider:

  • We mentor another from our own experience of being mentored by God. As we experience God’s “alongside-ness” in our up’s and down’s, joys and sorrows, we can more naturally share His overflow with someone who is where we have been.

 

“God comes alongside us when we go through hard times…”

  • We mentor another by getting close enough so that mutual vulnerability is natural and trusted. Authenticity is the vanguard of artless discipleship.

“…He brings us alongside someone else who is going through hard times so that we can be there for that person just as God was there for us.”

 

You don’t need a table to be a Table Mentor.

You do need an ongoing relationship with the Ultimate Mentor, and a bold desire to get close to someone who needs to hear what you’ve learned.

-Excerpt from Table Mentoring: A Simple Guide for Coming Alongside, Sue Moore Donaldson

Are YOU mentoring someone?

How about giving it a try? Come alongside someone who is going through something you have gone through in the past. You won’t regret it.

Also, check out my review of Nancy DeMoss Wolgemuth’s book Adorned: Living Out the Gospel Together

I’ve been coming alongside people with Fibromyalgia.

Fibro is one of those Invisible Chronic Illnesses. It’s so hard for family and loved ones to understand what is going on. I have created a Facebook page to help the friends and family of fibro warriors. Come join us over at Fibromyalgia – Is It for Real?  Maybe we can answer some of your questions.

facebook page

Click on the image above to go to my Fibro Facebook page.

Mandy Farmer

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Twenty Things We Would Tell Our 20-Something Selves

20 Somethings

I received a copy of this book from the publisher for the purpose of this review. However, the views are my own personal thoughts about this book. Links to purchase are my affiliate links.

What would I tell my 20-something self? 

Go out and grab it because life will all too soon get full and busy and the next thing you know your 20’s will be twenty years ago. I waited till I was 28 to start planning great vacations and fulfilling dreams. No sooner did I plan a trip to Taiwan, then I met and married my husband. Never made it to  Taiwan.

Excellent Resource for Your Life

I found this book chock full of excellent advice for any of us. Possibly, even those who are looking back and wondering what has happened to all your hopes and dreams. It’s never too late to take a turn for the better. And this book can help you do it, so purchase this book today. Dog-ear the pages that are important to you and start taking stock in your life. Store this book on a convenient shelf so that you can go back and read next year, and the next year, and the next. You will find ways to improve your life every time. Continue reading

Book Review: Adorned: Living Out the Beauty of the Gospel Together

I have been waiting years for a women’s mentoring resource like this.

Book Review AdornedADORNED

Living out the Beauty of the Gospel Together

by Nancy DeMoss Wolgemuth

{There are affiliate links on the page}

{I received a copy of this book from the publisher for the purpose of this review}

As a pastor’s wife, I have tried different times to encourage our ladies to live out the Titus 2 woman model. I used Bible Studies on the topic but I never seemed able to really get the point across. I could never explain it all well and why we should live this kind of life. Partly, I had older women I respected questioning the principle and I didn’t know how to answer them. But mainly, I didn’t have the right mentoring resource to help me.

Today, we have millennial women begging for help to find their way. But the situation is worse, the older women believe that the younger women do not want their help nor do they want to hear their message. This really isn’t true.

And I believe “Adorned” is the answer.

Continue reading

Effective Discipleship for Teens

discipleship[p This is my sister, Kandy Chimento. Years ago, she developed a wonderful discipleship program for teen girls. It was an amazing program and I have asked her to share a little about it.


Kandy Chimento has been in ministry with her husband since before their marriage nearly 30 years ago.  They have been blessed to minister in states from Texas to Wisconsin to Missouri and back to Texas again.  Though she served in children’s, youth, young adults, and lead pastors, her passion is discipleship!   She loves being a mom to their 2 grown-up children, Tyler and Christa.  Gardening, crafts, and quilting take up most of her free time.  They have recently downsized their empty nest and moved to the country, and love enjoying the big Texas outdoors! You can follow her writing about Gettin’ Back to Her Roots

 

“Women of Virtue”

One of my favorite endeavors is discipleship.  In my own experience, I became convinced that effective discipleship can be more of a life-changer than a hundred sermons.  One of my prime times of spiritual growth came through a small discipleship group I belonged to in my 20’s, and by the on-going mentoring of an older godly woman. When we were youth pastors in Kansas City, I felt led to create a discipleship course for high school girls. Continue reading